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sathi akter
Aug 02, 2022
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That are usually buried deep within the frozen soil. arrow_forward_iosunderstand more Powered by GliaStudio Scientists have yet to calculate the final thaw depth, but presumably haven't seen such a figure in nearly a century. According to a 2013 study in the journal Science, permafrost could thaw massively as long as temperatures are slightly warmer than today, and heat waves are now more frequent in high latitudes. What happens to permafrost thawing depends on the activity of the pathogenic factors it contains. Many microbes cannot survive Extreme cold, but some can tolerate it for many years. Jean-Michel Claverie, director of the French Mediterranean Institute of Microbiology and professor bulk sms service at the University of Aix-Marseille, said: "Bacillus anthracis is special because it can form spores. The spores are extremely resistant and can survive like seeds for more than century." Viruses can also survive for a long time. Krafish and his colleague, Chantal Abergel, published their research in 2014 and 2015, and found the Siberian broad-mouthed virus that is still pathogenic from a piece of Siberian permafrost that has existed for 30,000 years. (Pithovirus sibericum) and Siberian soft virus (Mollivirus sibericum), which infect only amoeba. But the finding is an indicator that viruses that can infect humans, such as smallpox and Spanish flu, May also be preserved in permafrost. SM178-016 Photo Credit: Scientist Magazine Viruses that sickened humans much earlier could also be present, such as early humans living in the Arctic, whose microbes may still be frozen in permafrost. "There are indications that Neanderthals and Denisovans may have migrated to northern Siberia and contracted some viral diseases, some of which we know, such as smallpox, and others may have disappeared," Krafoch said. There may be an infectious disease that has continued from the ancient human race to the present, which sounds fascinating, but also worrying.” Janet Jansson of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory isn't worried about ancient viruses. She pointed out that past attempts to find these pathogenic agents on cadavers have failed. 0Share
This difference may have widened or deepened the thaw, as well as activated microbes content media
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